Dietary Fiber | How much to take it

Dietary fiber is generally defined as “the total amount of indigestible components in food that are not digested by human digestive enzymes.” Dietary fiber is not a specific ingredient, but all indigestible ingredients that pass through the small intestine and reach the large intestine without being digested or absorbed.

It is an essential ingredient for health promotion, but many people lack it. Eat abundant foods aggressively to increase your intake.

Insoluble dietary fiber: cellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, etc.

Dietary fiber that is insoluble in water. Rich in plant foods, many of which are constituents of plant cell walls. Foods high in insoluble fiber need to be chewed well, which helps prevent premature eating and overeating. It also absorbs water and swells to increase the bulk of the stool and improve bowel movements.

Water-soluble dietary fiber: pectin, alginic acid, inulin, etc.

Dietary fiber that dissolves in water. Viscous ones give a sticky texture. It is effective in preventing lifestyle-related diseases because it suppresses the absorption of cholesterol and moderates the rise in blood sugar level. It is more susceptible to fermentation than insoluble dietary fiber and helps improve the intestinal environment.

How much dietary fiber should I take?

Dietary fiber that modern Japanese tend to lack. In order to take a sufficient amount, the Japanese Dietary Intake Standards 2020 edition sets the target amount that you want to take in a day as an immediate goal.

How to take dietary fiber well

Eat various foods

Dietary fiber is abundant in vegetable foods, so be aware of vegetable foods such as grains, potatoes, beans, vegetables, seaweeds, and fruits.

Even if you have a lot of dietary fiber, if you eat only the same food, you tend to feel like you are eating a lot, so in reality it may not be enough. From the aspect of nutritional balance, it is recommended to eat various vegetable foods.

Heat more than raw

Boiled vegetables reduce their bulk and make it easier to eat a lot at once. Since you can eat a lot, you can naturally increase your dietary fiber intake.

In addition, the dietary fiber that makes up the cell walls of vegetables is denatured by heat, making it easier for the body to take in nutrients inside the cells that are difficult to digest and absorb when eaten raw. There is also the outflow and loss of nutrients due to cooking, but it is thought that there are more benefits.

We recommend a lot of miso soup

It’s hard to prepare many kinds of side dishes every day! It is troublesome to think about various menus. We recommend the daily miso soup. Soup is also OK.

If you make soup, you can get all the nutrients that have flowed out, so there is no waste. If you cut potatoes, vegetables, mushrooms, etc. into appropriate sizes and freeze them, you can just put your favorite ingredients in a pot and boil them in the mood of the day. It is very easy to adjust the nutritional balance and replenish dietary fiber.

Foods rich in dietary fiber

Grain

Rice and wheat are rich in insoluble dietary fiber cellulose and hemicellulose.

Since it is used as a staple food, it is ingested in large amounts and is an important source of dietary fiber. Refining tends to reduce dietary fiber, so choose the one with the lowest degree of refining. For rice, it is rice or brown rice that has seven minutes longer than polished rice, and for wheat, it is whole grain. It is also effective to mix unrefined millet with polished rice.

Potato

Most of the dietary fiber contained is insoluble dietary fiber such as cellulose and hemicellulose, but it is not uniform. Garactan, a water-soluble dietary fiber with stickiness of taro, and konjac mannan (* 1), which gives a unique texture, are contained in konjac potatoes.

1 Most of the refined powder is water-soluble dietary fiber, but when it gels and becomes konjac or shirataki noodles, it becomes insoluble dietary fiber.

Beans

Soybeans are vegetable foods that are rich in protein. Dietary fiber is almost insoluble dietary fiber, which is rich in cellulose and hemicellulose, and also contains pectin, galactan, and arabinan. Beans other than soybeans are also rich in insoluble dietary fiber.

Some soy products are rich in dietary fiber and some are low in fiber. There is less soy milk and tofu made from soybean juice. On the other hand, the squeezed okara contains plenty of dietary fiber.

Vegetables

It is a food that is a source of vitamins, minerals, and dietary fiber in our daily diet. It is rich in insoluble dietary fiber such as cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin.

Raw food is good when you want to enjoy the freshness and texture, but cooking is recommended when you want to get more dietary fiber. In addition, depending on the type of vegetable and the dish, cooking with the skin can also help increase fiber intake.

Seaweed

All seaweeds contain cellulose and hemicellulose, which are insoluble dietary fibers that make up the cell wall. Water-soluble dietary fiber is characterized by what is contained depending on the type of seaweed.

For example, brown algae such as wakame seaweed and wakame seaweed contain alginic acid, fucoidan, and laminarin, which are viscous and are attracting attention as healthy ingredients. Agar contains agarose, which is involved in gelation, and agaropectin, which is involved in texture such as elasticity.

Fruit

Fruits contain insoluble dietary fiber cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. If you eat a lot of fiber, eat fruits instead of juices.

In addition, jam is made using the characteristics of pectin (* 2). The pectin melted by heat reacts with sugar and organic acids such as citric acid in fruits to change into a thick shape.

* 2 Pectin is insoluble in unripe fruits, but becomes water-soluble dietary fiber when properly ripened.

All seaweeds contain cellulose and hemicellulose, which are insoluble dietary fibers that make up the cell wall. Water-soluble dietary fiber is characterized by what is contained depending on the type of seaweed.

For example, brown algae such as wakame seaweed and wakame seaweed contain alginic acid, fucoidan, and laminarin, which are viscous and are attracting attention as healthy ingredients. Agar contains agarose, which is involved in gelation, and agaropectin, which is involved in texture such as elasticity.

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